MANAGEMENT

CCS

Chronic Coronary Syndromes (CCS) remain a major health burden globally. A decline in mortality from acute events has been observed but many patients progress to develop ischaemic heart failure. In the future, there will be an increase in chronic manifestations of CCS such as stable angina, due to the aging population and the obesity and diabetes epidemics.
Chronic stable angina in its various clinical presentations can be caused by obstruction of large epicardial arteries or by non-obstructive mechanisms including coronary epicardial spasm and coronary microvascular dysfunction. This dysfunction can be caused by both functional and structural alterations. Obstructive coronary artery disease, coronary spasm and coronary microvascular dysfunction can coexist in the same patients. This is why angina can persist after successful coronary revascularization in many patients.

References:
(1) Kaski JC, Crea F, Gersh BJ, et al. Reappraisal of Ischemic Heart Disease. Circulation 2018;138:1463-1480.
(2) Cannon RO, 3rd, Watson RM, Rosing DR, et al. Angina caused by reduced vasodilator reserve of the small coronary arteries. J Am Coll Cardiol 1983;1:1359-1373.
(3) Crea F. Doctor, I feel microvascular chest pain. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3219-3221.
(4) Knuuti J, Wijns W, Saraste A, et al. 2019 ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of chronic coronary syndromes. Eur Heart J 2020;41:407-477.
(5) Beltrame JF, Crea F, Kaski JC, et al. International standardization of diagnostic criteria for vasospastic angina. Eur Heart J 2017;38:2565-2568.
(6) Ong P, Camici PG, Beltrame JF, et al. International standardization of diagnostic criteria for microvascular angina. Int J Cardiol 2018;250:16-20.
Diagnosis

Angina is a multifactorial and medical therapy for its control should be tailored according to the guidelines and the “Diamond” approach. A key step is the initial risk stratification of suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). The main diagnostic pathways are described here:

diagnosis

Treatment

Angina treatment should be tailored according to guidelines and the “Diamond” approach. The COURAGE (Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation) trial published in 2007 demonstrated that an initial strategy of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) added to optimal medical therapy (OMT) did not reduce death, myocardial infarction, or other major cardiovascular events compared with OMT alone. So OMT remains a key component of therapy and should involve:

  • Adequate timing of intervention
  • Proper identification of high-risk patients
  • Taking into account regional differences and cultural specificities
Aims of pharmacological management
  • Reduce angina symptoms and exercise-induced ischaemia
  • Prevent cardiovascular events
Optimal treatment
  • Treatment that satisfactorily controls symptoms and prevents cardiac events
  • With maximal patient adherence and minimal adverse events
References:
(1) Knuuti J, Wijns W, Saraste A, et al. 2019 ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of chronic coronary syndromes. Eur Heart J 2020;41:407-477.
(2) Boden WE, O’Rourke RA, Teo KK, et al. Optimal medical therapy with or without PCI for stable coronary disease. N Engl J Med 2007;356:1503-1516.
(3) Boden WE. Interpreting the results of the COURAGE trial: a non-interventionalist perspective. Rev Cardiovasc Med 2009;10 Suppl 2:S34-44.
(4) Boden WE, Hartigan PM, Mancini J, et al. Risk Prediction Tool for Assessing the Probability of Death or Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease. Am J Cardiol 2020;130:1-6.